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Ammunition - Rifle Cartridges

.17 Ackley Hornet

Historical Notes:
The 17 Ackley Hornet is simply the 22 Hornet Improved necked down to 17 caliber. It was originated by P.O. Ackley in the early 1950`s and he describes this cartridge as one of the most balanced of the 17 caliber cartridges. Although small, it delivers ballistics equal to some o...

.17 Mach IV

Historical Notes:
Introduced by the O`Brian rifle company of Las Vegas, Nevada, this cartridge was intended to offer simple case conversion and good ballistics. It succeeded on both counts but could not compete against factory chambering, i.e. the 17 Remington.

General Comments:
This short c...

.17 Remington

One might think logically that a cartridge that`s been with us since 1971, one that burns about the same amount of powder as the .222, produces about the same amount of muzzle blast as the .223, generates about the same level of recoil as the .22 Hornet, and yet shoots as flat as the .22-250, wou...

.218 Bee

When Winchester introduced the .218 Bee in 1938, they probably figured that varmint shooters would buy any rifle as long as it was chambered for a new twenty two caliber centerfire cartridge. Obviously, their crystal ball was operating at less than full voltage, less than 6,000 Model 65 lever act...

.22 Hornet

Introduced by Winchester in 1930, the .22 Hornet was the first commercial varmint cartridge adopted by a U.S. manufacturer. The Hornet was developed during the 1920's by wildcatters who loaded the old .22 WCF case with smokeless powders and jacketed bullets. At that time, the most popular rifle f...

.22 PPC

Historical Notes:

The 22 PPC was developed in 1974 by Dr. Louis Palmisano and Ferris Pindell, primarily as a benchrest cartridge. Although originally a wildcat, Sako of Finland introduced commercial rifles and ammunition late in 1987. Norma followed suit on 1993 with loaded ammunition. The car...

.22 Savage High Power (.22 High Power)

Historical Notes:

Designed by Charles Newton and introduced as a commercial cartridge by Savage Arms Co. in their Model 99 lever action rifle about 1912. The cartridge was first called the "Imp". In the United States only Savage produced a commercial rifle in this caliber, although a great man...

.220 Swift

Since its introduction in the Winchester Model 54 in 1935, the .220 Swift has been a favorite punching bag of those who seek to find fault with everything in life. First the Swift was put down by wildcatters who were envious of its performance and even today it is a favorite target of those who f...

.222 Remington

The .222 Remington was created by Mike Walker, who also developed the button process for rifling barrels and the Models 721, 722, 40X, and 40XBR rifles. Introduced in 1950 in the Model 722, the .222 couldn`t have come along at a better time. Varmint shooters were yearning for a new cartridge and ...

.222 Remington Magnum (.22 Varminter, .22 Wotkyns Original Swift)

Any difference in performance between the .222 Remington Magnum and the .223 Remington will fit neatly beneath one's fingernail without the slightest discomfort. This includes both velocity and accuracy capability. Both cartridges were developed as candidates for military duty and therin lies the...

.223 Remington

During the mid-1950's, three .224" caliber cartridges were in contention to succeed the 7.62mm NATO as our primary military cartridge. They were the .222 Winchester, .224 Springfield, and.222 Special, the latter developed by Gene Stoner of Armalite. All were stretched versions of the .222 Remingt...

.224 Weatherby Magnum

The very first cartridge designed by Roy Weatherby in the 1940`s was the .220 Rocket, an improved version of the .220 Swift. The Rocket was not exactly a howling success, because even back then, shooters knew that very little velocity could be gained by burning more powder in a .224" caliber bore...

.225 Winchester

If there is any cartridge the chaps at Winchester would like to forget, it is probably the .225 Winchester. Had it's obituary appeared in the "New Haven Gazette" back in the 1960's, it might have read something like this: "Born in 1964 as a replacement for the .220 Swift, Died a victim of the .22...

.240 Weatherby Magnum

Introduced in the Mark V rifle in 1968, the .240 Weatherby Magnum was the last of a dozen cartridges introduced while Roy Weatherby was alive. Physically, the .240 bears a strong resemblance to the British designed .240 Apex or .240 Belted Nitro Express as it is more commonly called. With a rim d...

.243 Winchester

During its development, this one was called the 6mm Winchester, but when introduced in 1955, its name had been changed to .243 Winchester. The .243 along with the 7mm-08 Remington and the .358 Winchester, are offspring of the .308 Winchester case. Of the many new cartridges introduced since World...

.25-06 Remington

During the 1920's, a number of wildcatters worked with the .30-06 case necked down to .257" caliber. To name a few, there were the .25 Niedner, the .25 Griffen & Howe, and the .25 Whelen. All were similar in powder capacity, and all were handicapped by the lack of slow burning powders. It was not...

.25-20 Winchester (.25-20 WCF)

Prior to the introduction of the .22 Hornet in 1930, a Winchester Model 92 in .25-20 was considered to be just the ticket for varmint shooting. Introduced during the mid 1890'2, the .25-20 is one of the few cartridges to survive the transition from black to smokeless powder. This fine, mild manne...

.250-3000 Savage (.250-3000)

A new cartridge with a muzzle velocity of 3000 fps wouldn't cause today's hunters to look twice, but can you imagine what a ruckus it would kick up if the fastest commercially produced big game cartridge available was the Winchester 30-30? This was exactly the situation when Savage introduced the...

.256 Winchester Magnum

Even though the .256 Winchester is more flexible and thus more useful cartridge than the .25-20WCF, the Marlin Model 62 lever action and Universal Firearms M1 carbine are the only two rifles ever chambered for it. Obviously, few shooters took serious note of the cartridge since the production lif...

.257 Roberts (.257 Roberts +P)

Back in the 1920`s, N.H. (Ned) Roberts spent several years testing a number of .257" caliber wildcats on various cases. Probably upon suggestion of Charles Newton, Roberts finally settled on the 7 x 57mm Mauser case for his cartridge. Adolph Neidner built most of his test rifles, and Col. Townsen...

.257 Weatherby Magnum

The .257 Weatherby Magnum was introduced during the mid 1940's, back when Roy was still building custom rifles around war surplus '03 Springfield and the '98 Mauser actions. It was always a favorite cartridge.

There once was a time when everything written about such cartridges as the .257 Weat...

.264 Winchester Magnum

The .264 Winchester Magnum caused plenty of excitement when it was introduced in 1958. The color advertisement read: "The .264 Winchester Magnum, Its Makes A Helluva Noise And Packs A Helluva Punch." And it did. Then came the 7mm Remington Magnum to steal all the thunder and the .264 Magnums gath...

.30-06 Springfield

If rifle, cartridge, and reloading die sales, along with hunter opinion mean anything, the .30-06 is still the most popular big game cartridge in the world. Which is saying a lot when we consider that even after close to a century of trying, we still haven't come up with a cartridge that comes cl...

.308 Winchester (7.62mm NATO.)

The .308 Winchester has won more benchrest matches than any other cartridge above the 6mm caliber. And continues to win more Hunter class benchrest matches than all other cartridges combined. The .308 is also one of our most popular big game cartridges, not only in the U.S. but in many other coun...

.460 Weatherby Magnum

The .460 Weatherby Magnum's position in the lineup of rifle cartridges in this load data manual seems most appropriate since it is the last word in power among commercially produced big game cartridges. No other factory loaded cartridge burns so much powder in pushing so much bullet weight so fas...

15.2 mm Steyr APFSDS

15.2mm Steyr APFSDS is very formidable projectile. It fires 20 gramm (308 grains) tungsten dart (fleschette) with muzzle velocity of 1450 meters per second (4750 fps). At 1000 meters this projectile will penetrate a 40 mm of RHA (rollded homogenous steel armour) and will result in serious seconda...

5.6 mm Fleschette

To ensure maximum hit probability under battlefield stress the ACR ammunition design utilizes the latest kinetic energy projectile technology: a 9.85 grain carbon steel flechette in a lightweight synthetic case. The streamlined design and fin stabilization of this 5.56 X45 synthetic cased flechet...

6.5 Remington Magnum

When the 6.5 Remington Magnum was introduced in 1966, those who take great joy in redesigning every new cartridge that comes down the pike were in hog heaven. Some even went so far as to have custom rifles with long actions built so handloads with bullets seated out of the powder cavity could be ...

6.5 x 50 mm Japanese

The 6.5 x 50mm cartridge was introduced in 1897 and served as a Japanese military cartridge through World War II. Both the Model 1905 and its successor, the Model 99 Arisaka rifles, were chambered for this cartridge. The 6.5 x 50mm military cartridge was loaded with a 139 grain bullet at 2500 fps...

6.5 x 55mm Swedish Mauser

Thousands of Swedish Mausers imported into the U.S. after World War II introduced American hunters to what many consider to be the finest medium capacity 6.5mm cartridge developed during the tail end of the 19th century. And of all the war surplus rifles that invaded American soil during the fift...

6mm PPC

Historical Notes:
The 6mm PPC is an outgrowth of the .22 PPC and based on the same case configuration with the neck expanded to take 6mm (.243") bullets. This cartridge was also developed by Dr. Louis Palmisano and Ferris Pindell and based on the 220 Russian case, which is a variation of the 7.6...

6mm Remington / .244 Remington

It has been said on more than one occasion that when Remington engineers were developing the .244, their primary objective was to come up with a high performance varmint cartridge and for this reason decided to go with a maximum bullet weight of 90 grains. This isn't exactly true. Instead, after ...

6mm-.284

A unique distinction held by the .284 Winchester cartridge is that two of its wildcat offspring enjoy greater popularity among American shooters than their parent. One is the 6mm-284. According to RCBS, the sale of reloading dies for the 6mm-284 indicate that during the 1980's, it is still one of...

7.62 x 39 mm Russian (Soviet)

Developed and introduced for military use by Russia in 1943, the 7.62 x 39mm is the world`s most popular assault rifle cartridge. Thirty to fifty million Kalashnikov rifles have been made in this caliber in about a dozen countries, and close to 55 minor and major nations use it. Even though Russi...

7.92 mm Mauser M03/05

Two things should be remembered about the 8 x 57mm Mauser. For one, todays .323" bullets must not be used in Model 89 rifles with .318" bores. Secondly, the 8mm Mauser will do about anything the .30-06 will do. This, of course, make one wonder why cases weren`t formed simply by running .30-06 bra...

 

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